Homer Waterhouse

Date of Birth: February 13, 1876
Date of Death: April 7, 1952

Obituary

Homer Waterhouse was born at Mount Pleasant, Michigan, February 13, 1876, and passed away at Duluth after a brief illness, April 7, 1952. He was united in marriage with Anna W. Gaul, Tawas, Michigan, who preceded him in death. To this union five children were born all of whom survive. They are: Mrs. W. L. Bromme of Duluth; Russell of Minneapolis; Elton of Esko, Minnesota; Thurston of Sacramento, California; and Raymond of Wayzata, Minnesota; also 11 grandchildren, all of whom are members of the church where they live.

Homer Waterhouse joined the Duluth fire department in 1904, and was promoted to lieutenant in 1923. Seven years later his ability for leadership, and his trust-worthiness were rewarded in his being promoted to captain. In 1937 he retired from the fire department after 34 years of service. The same qualities which brought him such recognition while he was serving in the fire department he brought into the church to which he was devoted for more than 17 years. He served as head deacon of the church for the past 10 years, and was still recognized as such until his death. Brother Waterhouse did not have much encouragement for spiritual development during his youthful years, but his wife, a faithful member of the church and an active worker for God, set a noble example before her husband which we believe will result in a joyful reunion in the earth made new. Brother Waterhouse will be greatly missed by the church. He was always willing to do his part. He was loyal and dependable. Year after year he would perform his duties without having to be reminded. He was efficient in everything he did, and always at the right place at the right time. There were probably times when he could have found fault, but that was not his nature. A real prince has fallen, and he sleeps in Forest Hill cemetery. Services were conducted from the church by the writer.

Source: W. R. Archbold, Northern Union Outlook, May 13, 1952

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